Duke in Durham Courses

The Dynamic Oceans - BIO 157, EOS 102

The oceans and their impact on the Earth's surface, climate, and society. Topics include seafloor evolution, marine hazards, ocean currents and climate, waves and beach erosion, tides, hurricanes/cyclones, marine life and ecosystems, and marine resources. Emphasis on the historical, society and economic roots of oceanography, the formulation and testing of hypotheses, quantitative assessment of data, and technological developments that lead to understanding of current and future societal issues involving the oceans. Includes a field trip at the Duke University Marine Laboratory. Instructors: Glass


Gateway to Biology: Molecular Biology – BIO 201L

Introduces major concepts in biology through the lens of molecular biology. Molecular mechanisms that comprise the Central Dogma and variants. DNA structure and function, replication, transcription, and translation. Protein synthesis, folding, structure and function. Supporting topics related to the structure of cells, metabolism and energetics. Integration of physical and quantitative principles to molecular biology. Relevance to human diseases and the biotechnology industry. Laboratory includes an introduction to recombinant DNA technology. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101DL, or equivalent. Instructor: Buchler, Haase, McClay, Siedow, and Wray


Biological Responses to Climate Change – BIO 263

Lecture/discussion course on how organisms, populations, and biological communities are expected to respond to climate change. Topics include evidence for effects of climate change on organisms, how to experimentally test for potential effects of climate change, ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that organisms have—or do not have—that enable them to respond to climate change, community responses to climate change. Prerequisite: Biology 202L. Instructor: Donohue


Marine Science and Conservation Leadership - ENVIRON 350S

Course will explore the complex interactions among science, policy and economics in the use of marine resources and the role individuals play in promoting marine conservation and environmental sustainability. Utilizing case studies ranging from fisheries to offshore energy, students will evaluate trade-offs systematically and learn to assess how different policy options affect the incentives of resource users. Serves as the capstone for the Marine Science and Conservation Leadership Certificate. Prerequisite: none. Instructor: Staff


Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology – ENVIRON 360

An overview of the fate and effects of chemicals in the environment. Topics include chemical characterization of pollutants, chemistry of natural waters, soil sediment chemistry, atmospheric chemistry, transfers between and transformations within environmental compartments, toxicokinetics, cellular metabolism, biological levels of organization, and approaches for assessing chemical hazards. Incorporates case studies focused on human health and ecosystem protection. Prerequisite: Biology 101L; Chemistry 101DL and 210DL; Mathematics 21. Instructor: Stapleton


Energy and Environment Design – ENVIRON 452L

An integrative design course addressing both creative and practical aspects of the design of systems related to energy and the environment. Development of the creative design process, including problem formulation and needs analysis, feasibility, legal, economic and human factors, environmental impacts, energy efficiency, aesthetics, safety, and design optimization. Application of design methods through a collaborative design project involving students from the Pratt School of Engineering and Trinity College. Open only to students pursuing the undergraduate certificate in Energy and Environment. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Klein


Water Quality Health – ENVIRON 524, EOS 524

Explore basic concepts of water quality and human health with focus on the global water cycle, global water demand and availability, chemical properties of water, contaminants in water, health implications, and environmental isotope hydrology. Highlights relationships between human activities, water scarcity, water quality degradation, and ecological and health consequences. Addresses some policy implications related to conflicts over water resources and impact of energy production on water resources. Prerequisites: prior knowledge of introductory calculus and chemistry or consent of instructor. Instructor: Vengosh


Water Cooperation and Conflict – ENVIRON 543S, PUBPOL 580S, GLHLTH 533S, ICS 580S

Focuses on potential for transboundary water resources-related conflict and cooperation. Discusses water scarcity concepts, natural resource conflict theory, hydro politics, hydro hegemony, water security, water markets and institutions, game theory, and international water law. Other topics include the economics of water and health. Case studies complement the broader course outlook.  Instructor: Jeuland 


Ectotoxicology – ENVIRON 610

Overview of ecological and toxicological effects of chemicals on structure and function of ecosystems, primarily at population, community and ecosystem levels of biological organization. Topics include environmental fate and transport of contaminants, biomonitoring, biomarkers/bioindicators, evolution of resistance to pollution, and extrapolating from molecular interactions to ecosystems. Incorporates critical discussion of in-depth case studies to highlight application of ecotoxicological concepts to real-world scenarios. For graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Instructor: Raftery

DUML Courses

Gateway to Biology: Molecular Biology – BIO 201LA

Introduces major concepts in biology through the lens of molecular biology. Molecular mechanisms that comprise the Central Dogma and variants. DNA structure and function, replication, transcription, and translation. Protein synthesis, folding, structure and function. Supporting topics related to the structure of cells, metabolism and energetics. Integration of physical and quantitative principles to molecular biology. Relevance to human diseases and the biotechnology industry. Laboratory includes an introduction to recombinant DNA technology. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101DL. Taught only in the Beaufort Marine Lab program. Instructor: Schultz


Marine Ecology – BIO 273LA / ENVIRON 273LA / EOS 374LA

Factors that influence the distribution, abundance, and diversity of marine organisms. Course structure integrates lectures, field excursions, lab exercises and an independent project. Lecture topics include physical characteristics of marine systems, adaptation to environment, species interactions, biogeography, larval recruitment, and biodiversity and conservation of communities found in rocky shores, tidal flats, beaches, marshes, mangrove, coral reefs, and subtidal areas. Not open to students who have taken Bio 773LA. Prerequisite: AP biology, introductory biology or instructor consent. Instructor: Silliman, Kingston


Comparative Physiology of Marine Animals – BIO 278LA, ENVIRON 278LA

Physiology of marine animals with emphasis on comparisons between marine vertebrates and humans. Focus on physiological processes including gas exchange, circulation, osmoregulation, metabolism, thermoregulation, endocrine, neural control and sensory systems. Lectures and laboratories illustrate the methodology, analysis techniques, and written reporting of physiological research. One course (Given at Beaufort, Fall, Spring, and Summer). Prerequisites: AP biology, introductory biology, or consent of the instructor, and Chemistry 101DL. Instructor: Wise or Staff


Research Independent Study – BIO 293A

Individual research in a field of special interest, under the supervision of a faculty member the major product of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. May be repeated. Continued in Biology 493A. Taught only in the Beaufort Marine Lab program. Instructor: Staff


Research Independent Study – BIO 493A

Continuation of Biology 293A. Individual research and reading of the primary literature in a field of special interest, under the supervision of a faculty member, the major product of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Open to juniors and seniors only with consent of supervising instructor. (Given at Beaufort only). Prerequisite: Biology 293A or Biology 379LA. May be repeated. Instructor: Staff


Research Independent Study - ENVIRON 393A

Individual research in a field of special interest, under the supervision of a faculty member, the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Open to qualified students with consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies. Instructor: Staff


Marine Climate Change - ENVIRON 445A

Exploration of climate change science focusing on marine ecosystems and inhabitants - specifically ocean acidification, warming and sea level rise. Factors causing climate change, and how those vary spatially, focusing on sensitive polar ecosystems and marine mammal populations. Critical examination of climate change modeling using EdGCM (research-grade Global Climate Model), focusing on how scientists use models, observations/theory to predict climate, and assumptions/uncertainty implicit in modeling. Discussion of potential human impacts including consequences of sea level rise and potential increases in disease due to climate change. Instructor: Hunt